The Center for Contemporary Political Art
NOW OPEN
Monday & Tuesday, by appointment
Wednesday-Sunday, 12-6pm

Mather Studios
916 G Street NW
(Closest Metros: Gallery Place & Metro Center)
Come drink Trump’s
Kool-Aid and celebrate delusional thinking!
Join CCPArt and Joey Skaggs
Sunday, October 28, 2018
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ON VIEW NOW

DEFINING THE ART OF CHANGE IN THE AGE OF TRUMP
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Defining the Art of Change

PRE ORDER THE EXHIBITION CATALOGUE TODAY >

Defining, the first open-call exhibition presented by Washington’s new Center for Contemporary Political Art (CCPArt), invited artists from all fifty states and Puerto Rico to submit original work, challenging the artists to respond with art as powerful as the times are dangerous, to help Americans understand what’s at stake—and why it’s their duty to vote—in the November 2018 midterm elections.

With more than 500 submissions by almost 300 artists, CCPArt hopes that the Defining exhibition will lead to a redefinition of the role artists play in our society; identify the country’s leading practitioners of political art; and demonstrate why political art should be recognized as a valued genre of American art in the twenty-first century.

As the nation’s first research institute and exhibition space devoted exclusively to the study and strategic use of the Art of Civic Engagement, the Center will provide a means for the nation’s artists to create and exhibit art that will enrage, engage, and better inform We The People about the most important and contentious issues facing the country today.

Charles Krause, Founder 
Robin Strongin, Co Founder

Mission

The Center for Contemporary Political Art, a 501(c)(3) public corporation, will be the first research institute and exhibition space in the United States devoted to the study, patronage and strategic use of political fine art, continuing a tradition of fine art dating back at least to ancient Greece. Indeed, many of the greatest paintings and sculpture in the canon of Western art, from the carved portraits of Alexander the Great attributed to Lypossis (ca323-31) to Titian’s Las Furias (1548/49) to Picasso’s Guernica (1937) to Boris Lurie’s Adieu Amerique: Lumumba is Dead (1961), were created to convey political messages in the aftermath of war or to warn of impending crisis.

Shatter as triptych@300

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Together, we can empower artists to create the art of social and political change.

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